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irish1371

aux trans coolers

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ok throw out how ya liked your if you have used one. There are a lot of companies out there making them. I plan to mount it in front of the radiator and condenser. I would like about the largest one possible that will fit and work well. Getting tired of wearing boots so my feet don't burn while I go up hills.

 

The tunnel next to the gas pedal gets freaking hot. Wondering how much a 1" bl may help with this also- IF anyone has done that for heat reasons??

 

2006 lj auto 33" on 4" lift

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Tranny coolers are for cooling the tranny fluid. With some reare exceptions, they are almost always a good thing to install for auto equipped vehicles that see very much off-roading, or towing. Especially for longer hill climbs, and very low speed operation.

 

That said... High levels of floor pan heat is rarely the result of trans fluid temps, but most likely the result of either some piece of the exhaust running pretty close to the floor, or either a lean condition on non-catalytic systems, or a rich condition on catalytic equipped systems, both of which cause higher than "normal" exh. system temps. Have you inspected the exh to ensure it has good floor pan clearance... If so, have you tried installing an exhaust heat shield, with minimally 1" floor and 1/2" exh system clearance?

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The heat issue is the trans hump right at the gas pedal. Makes my right foot hot, not a lil- a lot. I will get under there and review the exhaust route, but unless there is something very odd on the 06 I don't remember then, the exhaust crosses over to the pass side and should not be up that high.

 

It does get worse when driving on hills or in areas when i crawl and have low air flow. It is such a pita I have been looking into fabbing up some old style kicker vents down at the foot rest level of my tub.

 

This is my 1st auto jeep so I was surprised at how much heat there seems to be comming off of that area. This is also my newest jeep so maybe I am taking something for granted/memory and not seeing an issue I have glassed over.

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Is the carpet and under padding still in place?

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OB1, by exhaust shield do you mean for the muffler/catalytic converter or for the whole system? Would that be the wrap that goes on exhausts?

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yep still fully carpeted atm. factory flooring all in place

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yep still fully carpeted atm. factory flooring all in place
Sumthin's not right in Denmark...:rolleyes: Without seeing it, I'm gonna hazard a guess that exhaust is too close to the floor (or shielding missing), OR there is a malfunction involving fuel strategy, causing higher than normal exh temps.

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OB1, by exhaust shield do you mean for the muffler/catalytic converter or for the whole system? Would that be the wrap that goes on exhausts?
Wraps can help with some exh heat related issues, but are usually of most benefit in situations where only a small amount of temp reduction is desired.

 

With some rare exceptions (such as the uses of some extremely $exotic$ materials, the most cost effective (best) solution to exh heating issues involves is increasing the distance from the heat source to the floor. IE: moving the exh (or the body) to increase clearance.

 

The second best (following increasing the clearance), is the use of a reflective barrier between the floor and the heat source, which reflects a portion of the radiant heat back towards the heat source. That shield/barrier can be body mounted, or exh mounted, and is increasingly more effective the larger the air gap between the heat source and the shield, and the larger air gap between the shield and the floor. NOTE: (The exh wrap falls into this category, but the lack of air space between it and the heat source, severely reduces it's effectiveness)...:(

 

While carpeting and the wrap work in much the same way, in that they slow the transfer of heat because they are poor conductors of heat, "contact insulators" (those in direct contact with the heat or heat-sink surfaces) become increasingly effective, A- the smaller the temperature differential of the heat source and the heat sink are, and B- the thicker they are. That's why the carpeting on the inside is more effective than the exh. wrap. . ;)

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I'm taking a guess that with it being a 2006 you don't have that much mileage on it so I wouldn't guess a clogged cat. If you have or can get a hold of a live data scanner jack in and see what your o2 sensors are reading. after its warmed up and while running.

 

OBDII is your friend. as other might say "embrace the darkside"

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I'll have a scanner with me at the cinders this year.

I can also clear ses lights.

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