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Bradywgn71

Feds: 1,300 square miles of S. Arizona is jaguar habitat

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"A 60-day public comment period on the proposal will begin soon" - we need to find out where and how to best comment on this...

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It will just make it easier for illegals to get in without law abiding citizens to call them in. We need to add this to the battle we are getting into over forest roads, we have a discussion on the hunting forums about wheelers and hunters uniting together to fight these closures and restrictions

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I was very excited when they announced a jaguar was seen (and photographed) in southern Arizona a few years ago. I would love to see one in the wild (in the safety of my Wrangler :-) and am a huge cat fan, but this appears to be a little extreme. With all the news coming in: Coconino closing more than 50% of the trails, El Dorado Forest closing roads (not the Rubicon, but I wouldn't be surprised if that's next on the chopping block), possibly much of the southern Arizona mountains, it seems the USFS is heading down the path that all we will be able to do is look at the forest through a glass partition from a visitor's center on a paved road! Sorry, I'll close now, my fur's all riled up. If anyone here's when the public forum is, please keep us informed.

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Had a personal run in with Coconino last weekend, and it left a bad taste in the mouth of everyone in our camp. I will be doing a write up on it sometime soon, because the ranger we dealt with changed his story multiple times and we feel he singled us out for being hunters.

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I was very excited when they announced a jaguar was seen (and photographed) in southern Arizona a few years ago. I would love to see one in the wild (in the safety of my Wrangler :-) and am a huge cat fan, but this appears to be a little extreme. With all the news coming in: Coconino closing more than 50% of the trails, El Dorado Forest closing roads (not the Rubicon, but I wouldn't be surprised if that's next on the chopping block), possibly much of the southern Arizona mountains, it seems the USFS is heading down the path that all we will be able to do is look at the forest through a glass partition from a visitor's center on a paved road! Sorry, I'll close now, my fur's all riled up. If anyone here's when the public forum is, please keep us informed.

 

No, you can always pay to stay in a FS approved campsite next to Bart Simpson's extended family complete with barking dogs, crying babies, 100 db loud Waylon Jennings and all the things you fled Phoenix for! :eek:

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Bradywgn71, thanks for the update. I am glad to see that it appears some common sense is being used. Let's see how far we can take it.

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The most interesting part of the last article linked:

 

"I find it curious that the proposed “Critical Habitat” includes the Rosemont site, the site of mineral exploration farther south near Patagonia, and the water source for the City of Tombstone, but does not include the Chiricahua Mountains farther to the east near the New Mexico portion of proposed habitat. According to the National Park Service, “The Chiricahua mountains were also historically the home of the jaguar.” Of course, there are no known economic mineral deposits in the Chiricahua Mountains. That makes it look like the radical environmentalists and USFWS are targeting potentially productive land to make them off limits.

 

Another question: How will designation of “Critical Habitat” affect border security?"

 

 

What? An agenda? :rolleyes:

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Also from the last article, I found this very interesting. Two years ago he wrote:

 

"A Freedom of Information Act inquiry has revealed that the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service decision to declare portions of Arizona and New Mexico as “Critical Habitat” for the jaguar has no basis in fact. USFWS based its decision on unsubstantiated anecdotal stories that did not meet the Endangered Species Act definition of minimum scientific standards. The inquiry also found possible collusion between an employee of the Arizona Fish and Game Department and the Center for Biological Diversity. The report of the inquiry was written by Biologist/Attorney Dennis Parker."

 

I wonder if this is true for the road closures?

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