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dzJeepChic

ScottLs 2001 XJ

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On Sunday morning, i went to the garage to wash the Jeep and found my driver side rear shock dangling just inches off the ground

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The shock stud ripped free from the Zone high clearance shock mount we installed a couple years ago. I called my buddy Ben again, the one theKsmith refers to as "Mobile Jeep Fabber Guy" and asked him to bring his trusty Lincoln 110 & a couple pieces of scrap 1/4" steel. Yesterday he came over and burned in some reinforcement

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I think 1/4" plate would be better than 3/16" for load specifications on this particular bracket. I might send an e-mail to the Zone guys showing them what happened to mine. They'll probably tell me to go fly a kite

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Obviously the brackets have been introduced to a rock or two in the relatively short time i've had them. The other side is still holding up but it looks like it is literally beginning to buckle under pressure too

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I swiped some extra 1/4" plate off my friend in the event the same thing happens to the passenger side down the road.

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..I will probably end up needing a longer shock stud eventually but for now a little loctite should suffice.

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Well, at least you were going to wash it and not about to take off for the trail in it!

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under straight upward axle movement (not extreme articulation) - are you sure your bump-stops are fully stopping the axle before your shocks bottom out? i don't see any other reason that it would have ripped straight out the bottom of the mounts you had besides bottoming out.

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under straight upward axle movement (not extreme articulation) - are you sure your bump-stops are fully stopping the axle before your shocks bottom out? i don't see any other reason that it would have ripped straight out the bottom of the mounts you had besides bottoming out.

 

That's what I was thinking.

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Good thing you checked it out, or else it will ruin every thing. Nice fab by the way.

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It's hard to tell for certian by the pics, but the fracture zone makes it appear the shock retention nut may have loosened prior to total failure.

 

I doubt that the shock bottomed and caused this failure, as it would most likely have damaged the shock valving and seal, instead, or at least in addition to this damage.

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under straight upward axle movement (not extreme articulation) - are you sure your bump-stops are fully stopping the axle before your shocks bottom out? i don't see any other reason that it would have ripped straight out the bottom of the mounts you had besides bottoming out.

 

No, i did notice my bumpstop on the driver side has deteriorated somewhat, it's cracked & there's this hole which may have hampered its ability to stop the axle

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I have about 4" of shock shaft visible & my bumpstops are 8" above the axle with the jeep sitting level on the ground.

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I've bottomed out a few times, like when we were loaded down with gear on the Rubicon trail, but it's not a common occurrence. I've been looking at these extended bumpstops but haven't heard anyone else saying if they work or not

day-KJ09120.jpg

Maybe the best question is, how would I properly measure straight upward axle movement, remove the leaf springs?

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It's hard to tell for certian by the pics, but the fracture zone makes it appear the shock retention nut may have loosened prior to total failure.QUOTE]

 

from this picture it looks like the retention nut might be loose or maybe the bracket's just bent on the one thats still good

EA8F8443-603C-4A00-8D71-3A2C3CD47510_zps47zxmtdr.jpg

I'll check to make sure it's securely tightened when i get home.

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Maybe the best question is, how would I properly measure straight upward axle movement, remove the leaf springs?

Scott,

There is no need to remove springs to get the end result you are seeking.

 

The dimension you will need is called "Metal-to-metal Jounce clearance". It is measured by removing the jounce bumper, then measuring vertically, from the top of the axle tube (or bracket/pad which contacts the jounce bumper), to the surface to which the jounce bumper is normally affixed.

 

Once you know that vertical metal-to-metal jounce clearance dimension, it is an easy task to remove the lower shock anchor mount, and compress the shock until you have compressed it to the point that the lower shock anchor is now directly vertical from where it attached to the axle bracket, at a dimension that is equal to that which you just measured as the metal-to-metal jounce clearance.

 

If the shock bottoms before you are able to reach that dimension, then the compressed length of the shock is too long, and as Kris surmised, can cause the damage you experienced, in addition to potentially damaging the shock internal valving and seals.

 

Ideally, you want just a touch more compressibility of the shock before it bottoms, to accommodate any added compression that a severe dynamic loading may create. To achieve this without resorting to purchasing new shocks, you may find it necessary to space the jounce bumper cushion downwards.

 

Hope this helps… ;)

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