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Desert Scruff

Air Pressure

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I'm aware of tire pressure when off the pavement but I have a question when on the pavement. I'm talking about a 2010 four-door Rubicon. The sticker on the door says 37 pounds. Is that what people are running? I've got a heavier Toyota 4-Runner and its stickers calls for only 32 pounds. The Rubicon tires are the original BFG Mud-Terrain KM 255/75 R17.

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What does it call for on the tire itself? I always go by that over the stickers.

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The tires show 50 pounds. I was always told to run it at the door sticker recommendation. That just seems high to me.

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Follow the recommendations on the door sticker for the factory tires.

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I agree: 50 does seem high.

 

I also agree with the sticker info for factory tires. I didn't see that in the original post; my apologies.

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2011 Rubicon, I run just over 35PSI on the street. TPMS makes an angry little yellow light on the dash below 35PSI.

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The pressures shown on the tire are NOT intended to be used as "set-to" pressures, but simply provide information on the tires designed MAX load capacity, when inflated to the stated pressure. Keep in mind it is RARE that a tire is used on a single model vehicle, but is typically designed to be compatible on multiple vehicles of similar size and intended uses, even when used on vehicles from differing manufacturers, each with their own tire pressure recommendations that may or may not be the same, for the identical tire...

 

When using the OEM tires, (or orig replacements) ALWAYS follow either the door sticker, or the owners manual stated pressure recommendations for hwy uses...

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Thanks for the input. I will keep it at 37 pounds on the highway.

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The pressures shown on the tire are NOT intended to be used as "set-to" pressures, but simply provide information on the tires designed MAX load capacity, when inflated to the stated pressure. Keep in mind it is RARE that a tire is used on a single model vehicle, but is typically designed to be compatible on multiple vehicles of similar size and intended uses, even when used on vehicles from differing manufacturers, each with their own tire pressure recommendations that may or may not be the same, for the identical tire...

 

When using the OEM tires, (or orig replacements) ALWAYS follow either the door sticker, or the owners manual stated pressure recommendations for hwy uses...

 

It amazes me just how many people aren't aware of this. It even says MAX capacity right next to it.

 

Scruff, 35psi is a good baseline to start from, but if your door sticker reads 37, then I'd suggest going with that. One or two pounds isn't going to make a critical difference.

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Jeff, yes it is amazing how many people--and what kind of people--don't know it is the maximum pressure the tire can take. I was getting a flat tire from a nail I picked up on Utah's Yellow Cat Road. I went into a shop in Green River that fixes flats, among other things, and after the repair I noticed the fellow was taking a long time to put air in he tire. "How much are you putting in?" I asked. "Fifty pounds, that's what the tire says," he replied. When I told him 37 pounds was enough he looked at me like I was crazy.

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