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Desert Scruff

Air Pressure

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Without seeing your replacement tires, it is difficult-to-impossible to know for sure, however, I suspect that either; they were not rotated, the alignment may have been slightly off, or perhaps tire pressures may not have been properly monitored.

 

In any event, all of the above can lead to un-wanted tire wear, such as cupping, and/or feathering of the tread, which in turn can create annoying noise, and increase rolling resistance.

 

Steve,

To look at the tires you can't see and cupping or feathering of the tread. The tires are ~ 94 months older than my originals if you go by the date code on each tire. (replacements = 2708 -vs originals = 1910). That was factored into the pricing when I got them from the owner. ;)

~Jim

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Steve,

To look at the tires you can't see and cupping or feathering of the tread. The tires are ~ 94 months older than my originals if you go by the date code on each tire. (replacements = 2708 -vs originals = 1910). That was factored into the pricing when I got them from the owner. ;)

~Jim

WOW Jim... That would mean they are minimally 8-10 years old... :( In that event, Scott L's thoughts about hardened rubber may be what your are experiencing/feeling...

 

Tires have a shelf life that can be shortened by exposure to ozone. Ozone is naturally present in the atmosphere in low concentrations, but is exacerbated/concentrated in the presence of heat, and especially around machinery using significant levels of electrical current... Thus one of the worst things you can do is store tires exposed directly to the AZ sun, or next to a large electrical motor or generator, and especially so in a poorly ventilated enclosure containing such electrical equipment.

 

This may not be what you had hoped to hear, but because of the age of the tires you just installed, I suspect your juste replaced tires carcass could potentially be, at least as structurally as sound as the ones you just installed...:o:(

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I replaced my BFG TA's about a year ago with my Falken's. At the time I replaced them, they were about 5 years old and had 50% tread with even wear on them. I replaced them because they were hard as a rock and rode terrible. I figure that I had about 50k miles on them and feel like I had got my $ worth out of them. I'm sure that the used tire people jumped all over them and they are living on some other vehicle still.

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WOW Jim... That would mean they are minimally 8-10 years old... :(

 

Not sure we are on the same page with the date code. I thought the last two digits were the year they were made. The replacements have a date code of "08" being 2008 does it not? The first two digits are the week number of the year. So for 2008, week 27 was July 1. For the 2010 tires the week code was 19 or about May 12.

 

At the time of this posting, I'd say the replacement tires are then 5 years and one week old. The guy had them stored in his garage for 6 months and another 6 months in my garage. So at the time I purchased them I felt I had tires that were about 4 years old. Consumer safety experts (who ever they are; but is was stated on the internet, so it must be true!) say over 6 years old tires are considered too old. Like you said, a lot a factors determine the real age of a tire. It is just like people; none of you would guess I am really 72 years old would you? :)

 

Well the bottom line is these tires were a gap fill in until I get my lift and larger tires. All this tire talk makes me now want to pull the trigger a little sooner.

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Not sure we are on the same page with the date code. I thought the last two digits were the year they were made. The replacements have a date code of "08" being 2008 does it not? The first two digits are the week number of the year. So for 2008, week 27 was July 1. For the 2010 tires the week code was 19 or about May 12.

 

At the time of this posting, I'd say the replacement tires are then 5 years and one week old. The guy had them stored in his garage for 6 months and another 6 months in my garage. So at the time I purchased them I felt I had tires that were about 4 years old. Consumer safety experts (who ever they are; but is was stated on the internet, so it must be true!) say over 6 years old tires are considered too old. Like you said, a lot a factors determine the real age of a tire. It is just like people; none of you would guess I am really 72 years old would you? :)

 

Well the bottom line is these tires were a gap fill in until I get my lift and larger tires. All this tire talk makes me now want to pull the trigger a little sooner.

My bad Jim... I apologize for that, I simply did not look closely enough at the date coding...:o:o:o Your "new" tires are indeed ~ 5yrs old...:o:o:o

 

Thus I am unsure why they are giving you noise, and harsher ride quality, unless they are slightly cupped (try running your hand lightly across the tread in the direction of rotation...both forward and reverse directions, to check for feathering or cupping)... Or possibly they may be of a different load range than your originals??

 

Steve

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Whether they're 5 years old or 8, from my experience, load range as well as garage storing used tires for over a year will effect on road noise as well as tread wear unless maybe you've got one of these:

hyperbaricchamber2.jpg

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Thus I am unsure why they are giving you noise, and harsher ride quality, unless they are slightly cupped (try running your hand lightly across the tread in the direction of rotation...both forward and reverse directions, to check for feathering or cupping)... Or possibly they may be of a different load range than your originals??

 

Steve

No load range is the same. They are the exact same tire, just made at different dates!

 

I did find ONE tire with slight cupping by doing just as you suggested, running my hand in both directions across the tire tread. So that must be it.

 

Thanks,

Jim

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