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4x4tographer

Paint Rocker Damage from Mud

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So my rocker panels are getting REALLY chewed up by mud getting stuck between the paint and my rock rails.

 

I can only assume the vibration while driving is making the grit and rocks embedded in the mud act like a sand paper along the entire length of the slider.

 

Any suggestions on where to go from here?

 

I’m toying with the idea of hitting it with a clear coat as a temporary fix to prevent the possibility of rust until I get a more permanent repair done.

 

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Paint protection film is good for stuff like that if you want to keep the factory paint color

 

 

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1 hour ago, defectivemonk said:

Paint protection film is good for stuff like that if you want to keep the factory paint color

 

 

 

yup, i've got the same problem and was considering some XPEL film... thinking about going with the black to cover up the scars and maybe just blend into the look of the rock rails.

Edited by theksmith
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57 minutes ago, theksmith said:

 

yup, i've got the same problem and was considering some XPEL film... thinking about going with the black to cover up the scars and maybe just blend into the look of the rock rails.

 

Thats a nice find! I was toying with the idea of a metal rocker guard like this, but I REALLY don't want to drill 32 holes in my sheet metal and install rivnuts everywhere. Bushwhacker makes a 3M adhered TPO plastic guard that looks interesting, but I'm also not sure about that much 3M tape all over the body.

 

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I've had the XPEL film on several cars on the front spoiler & running boards and on the jeep grill/hood as a "bra" - it soaks up all the damage from gravel and debris.  It comes off cleanly with a heat gun (and scratches and dents can usually be repaired with a few seconds of high heat). If you get a pre-cut kit it's not too hard to apply yourself, but does need a heat gun.

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5 hours ago, 4x4tographer said:

 

Thats a nice find! I was toying with the idea of a metal rocker guard like this, but I REALLY don't want to drill 32 holes in my sheet metal and install rivnuts everywhere. Bushwhacker makes a 3M adhered TPO plastic guard that looks interesting, but I'm also not sure about that much 3M tape all over the body.

 

Come on now what's with bashing Metal Cloaks sliders?? In other words I just put on those sliders. Yes you have to pop a lot of holes (moderately labor intensive) but  they are solid. No squeaks or rattles. I did run a bead on clear silicone along the edges to prevent any dirt/sand from getting behind the armor.

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16 hours ago, defectivemonk said:

I've had the XPEL film on several cars on the front spoiler & running boards and on the jeep grill/hood as a "bra" - it soaks up all the damage from gravel and debris.  It comes off cleanly with a heat gun (and scratches and dents can usually be repaired with a few seconds of high heat). If you get a pre-cut kit it's not too hard to apply yourself, but does need a heat gun.

 

Excellent - thanks Chris!

 

14 hours ago, Stacey and Scott said:

Come on now what's with bashing Metal Cloaks sliders?? In other words I just put on those sliders. Yes you have to pop a lot of holes (moderately labor intensive) but  they are solid. No squeaks or rattles. I did run a bead on clear silicone along the edges to prevent any dirt/sand from getting behind the armor.

 

Not bashing Metalcloak at all - got about 500lbs of MC gear on my JL. 😉  Its more the nature of any metal rocker guard and the method of install.

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On 8/15/2021 at 6:30 AM, 4x4tographer said:

So my rocker panels are getting REALLY chewed up by mud getting stuck between the paint and my rock rails.

 

I can only assume the vibration while driving is making the grit and rocks embedded in the mud act like a sand paper along the entire length of the slider.

 

Any suggestions on where to go from here?

 

I’m toying with the idea of hitting it with a clear coat as a temporary fix to prevent the possibility of rust until I get a more permanent repair done.

 

Gf7bzoJ.jpg
Kz3qGwo.jpg
vLpsrsf.jpg

Ryan,

The pics you provided here don't show how the sliders attach, but from the damage I see in the photos, there is no doubt that there is rather significant amount of relative movement between the slider and the body panel.   From that, I believe the sliders are not attached to the body, but are instead attached to the frame.  

Since adding a "protective barrier" does not correct the differential of movement, I doubt you are going to find many materials that will permantly be capable of withstanding the abrasion caused by small stones and debris that will become lodged between these two, as the relative motion of the two will continue to exist.   IE:

IMHO, the permanent fix would be to correct the thing that is causing this issue.   Either move the slider further away from the body, or mount some sort of protection directly to the body as opposed to the frame.   But DO NOT try to attach the slider to both the body AND the frame.

That said, if the costs aren't prohibitive, it would be worth a try to add some sort of protective coating over the paint, just be prepared to be changing the coating occasionally, as the issue of things getting caught and abrading the soft painted surface will still exist... ;)
 

Edited by ob1jeeper

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1 minute ago, ob1jeeper said:

Ryan,

The pics you provided here don't show how the sliders attach, but from the damage I see in the photos, there is no doubt that there is rather significant amount of relative movement between the slider and the body panel.   From that, I believe the sliders are not attached to the body, but are instead attached to the frame.  

Since adding a "protective barrier" does not correct the differential of movement, I doubt you are going to find many materials that will permantly be capable of withstanding the abrasion caused by small stones and debris that will become lodged between these two, as the relative motion of the two will continue to exist.   IE:

IMHO, the permanent fix would be to correct the thing that is causing this issue.   Either move the slider further away from the body, or mount it to the body as opposed to the frame.

That said, if the costs aren't prohibitive, it would be worth a try to add some sort of protective coating over the paint, just be prepared to be changing the coating occasionally, as the issue of things getting caught and abrading the soft painted surface will still exist... ;)
 

 

You're absolutely correct @ob1jeeper, these are frame mounted sliders. Unfortunately, they're not very adjustable (nor of particularly good quality).

Good call on the body moving relative to the frame. I hadn't thought about that being an issue, but it makes perfect sense.

 

Long term, I'm looking at upgrading to something more robust that sits a little further away from the body. I'm partial to frame mounted as I feel they're better protection, but it seems there are a billion body mounted options that all mate up to the pinch-seam.

 

I'll absolutely be putting some clear paint over these areas as a stopgap. :) 

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PM'd you... ;)

 

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