Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
LaZorraRoja

Relay to a relay?

Recommended Posts

I bought a new compressor from Napa and want to hardwire it to my Jeep. I don't have the factory auxiliary switches, so I bought a set by offroadland. The problem I'm pondering is this: 

This Napa compressor draws 90A max. Too much for the offroadland switch/relays (40A). I was thinking I can still use it if I get another relay, and switch it with the output from the switch kit. 

Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, LaZorraRoja said:

I bought a new compressor from Napa and want to hardwire it to my Jeep. I don't have the factory auxiliary switches, so I bought a set by offroadland. The problem I'm pondering is this: 

This Napa compressor draws 90A max. Too much for the offroadland switch/relays (40A). I was thinking I can still use it if I get another relay, and switch it with the output from the switch kit. 

Thoughts?

 

yes, your switch/relay box output can simply power the coil of a high-current relay. i've used this one before with large compressors.

 

be sure to run a decent gauge wire to the big relay's switching terminals directly from the battery and then onto the compressor - probably 8 AWG.  EDIT: note it's fine to ground to the body/frame wherever you mount the compressor, i.e. you only need to run a single large-gauge positive lead direct to the battery.

 

just out of curiosity, did you buy that dual-headed 10LPM one from Napa? where are you planning to hard-mount it?

Edited by theksmith
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup that's the one. Test fill one of my 35x10.5x17s from 12 to 36 took just over a minute. 

I'm thinking to mount it in the bed and plumb it to a 4 port manifold. The stuff I'm reading says it needs 2awg. The wires it comes with are pretty darn beefy. I didn't think to ground it close to the mount. Duh. That will save some coin! 

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Trail Toy said:

 

I use breakers like that instead of fuses for my power wires that power my subwoofer amps.  It's convenient if you want to cut power to the amp for whatever reason and if something goes wrong you don't have to go out and find/spend money on fuses.

So now we know you rattled your track bar loose with your boys with the boom set up? Lol

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LaZorraRoja said:

That would be in addition to the relay, correct? 

That is correct. You would put this as close to the battery a possible(before the relay). In doing this it will protect the circuit from any dead shorts ( power going straight to ground) and eliminates the need for a inline fuse.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first thought was questioning whether adding a breaker is redundant, bc the switch panel has fuses in it already. I'm pretty sure the compressor has something like that as well. 

 

Hmm.

 

Thinking out loud here- 

The fuse in the switch box isn't actually connected to the compressor power, so it's only protecting the circuit from the switch to the 120amp relay. Therefore, a breaker is not redundant and helps protect the high current circuit running the length of the vehicle to the mounting location.

 

Correct me if I'm looking at it wrong. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"...breaker is not redundant and helps protect the high current circuit running the length of the vehicle to the mounting location"

 

exactly. very important to put a breaker or fuse near the battery on that wire.

 

i would also suggest some sort of loom around that wire to protect from chafing. here is one source for high temperature UV-stable loom that won't quickly degrade from engine bay heat or sun exposure.

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LaZorraRoja said:

My first thought was questioning whether adding a breaker is redundant, bc the switch panel has fuses in it already. I'm pretty sure the compressor has something like that as well. 

 

Hmm.

 

Thinking out loud here- 

The fuse in the switch box isn't actually connected to the compressor power, so it's only protecting the circuit from the switch to the 120amp relay. Therefore, a breaker is not redundant and helps protect the high current circuit running the length of the vehicle to the mounting location.

 

Correct me if I'm looking at it wrong. 

And a gold star for you! As far as the protection on the compressor odds are it's just a thermal overload that resets when it cools back down (my comp is mounted under the rear deck, away from engine heat)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...