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BigTuna117

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BigTuna117 last won the day on April 20 2018

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About BigTuna117

  • Rank
    Adventure Seeker

Basic Info

  • Rig
    "Pegasus" 1999 Jeep WJ 4.7L
  • Location
    Fort Mohave, AZ, US

My Details

  • First Name
    Michael
  • Experience Level
    Intermediate
  • Preferred Trail Rating
    Moderate
  1. Well, the rig has returned to us after several weeks of refit at a local mechanic shop. To say that she is running well... is an understatement. She received: A full tuneup, new belts, hoses, wires, plugs etc. re-cored radiator... since nobody makes these rads anymore! rebuilt fuel system, with proper "helper" electric fuel pump and regulator & custom hard fuel lines. The ORIGINAL in-dash A/C system has been brought back to life with a new compressor and hoses. Now running r134a and staying very, very cool. new turn signal switch front end re-lube new transmission and oil pan seals new valve cover seals new exhaust manifold seals & some work to reduce a tick/ leak on the passenger bank ... and now the cosmetic work begins. A water main break somewhere in the back calls for our attention, meanwhile we have acquired all of the beadboard paneling for the ceiling. We also decided to tile over the plain wood in the kitchen area, giving it a cleaner look while still looking "in place" In the meantime, I'm also doing research for vintage or "vintage styled" 12v lights. the six 12v "main lights" across the cabin are ridiculously small, and worn out anyways. The problems I face are simple, it seems like not many 12v fixtures deviate from plain white and clear, with a more "modern" look about them. I found a few companies who make vintage reproductions, but primarily of the late 80's fake-woodgrain florescent fixtures that everybody used at the time. Once the main is repaired, the ceiling retrofitted, we'll be ready to rip up the carpet and replace it. It will be replaced with some sort of laminate or hardwood, depending on what ends up being durable and easy to clean. It's good to have this project back on track again.
  2. And now, a review of the Mishimoto Thermostat I installed three years ago. Needs improvement, unfortunately.
  3. You remember that time about 4 years ago when I messed with LED headlight bulbs? I did it again, with better results.
  4. I very much like the idea myself. As long as the leg is adjustable!
  5. Sorry 'bout that, Scott. I was typing that whilst drinking my morning coffee and missed an "I." Didn't mean for that to sound snarky. ... "Before I gave you a definitive opinion," is what it was supposed to say. Now that I have seen the build video, here's my couple of opinions. I feel like I'd constantly hit myself on hinge mounted steps, though I do understand the practicality. I agree with you, I believe that the propane tank would pose a hazard in a narrow traverse. I also agree with Kris. There's a lot going on externally- especially in the lighting department. I like the awning, (and the RTT) but such things do definitely take a toll on weight and topheaviness of a vehicle. I know in my own case it wouldn't really be practical in my stage of life as a single, 5'11" guy who can just drop a twin mattress down inside the Jeep and sleep in relative comfort. I'm jealous of the drawer system, and the fridge. Especially the fridge. I too appreciate that things hold functionality it appears.
  6. I actually Ran into these guys in Sedona when I was doing the Shakedown for my re-worked suspension. I didn't get out and talk, but hey, I did get a wave and a thumbs up. These rigs get used, so I suspect that the parts came to be put on piece by piece in a more "Necessity is the mother of invention" type way. But also trying to keep it lookin' cool up front. I've always lived by the philosophy that "If there is a reasonable explanation for it, then it makes sense." In other words, I'd need to see a build video explaining the different additions and why they came to be before I gave you a definitive opinion.
  7. Today the Jeep received an addition which is both useful and functional! I purchased a Remote start system from Syracuse Synergy, a small company which specializes in setting up remote start systems which are about as close to plug and play as you can get! Pre-flashed for the platform and ready to rock, It comes with the remote start "brain" and bypass module already hooked together. All you have to do is wire it in, and program it to your key! A pretty reasonable price, too. They (well, he, I believe William is a one man operation) also give you any support you may require, via e-mail, Facebook, or even Text message. That being said, I reckon it's pretty fool proof. Here's the system I ordered from them. They also offer a more "basic" system which does not utilize a 2 way remote. http://syracusesynergy.com/product/rs2waywj/
  8. Well, we've all come this far, it'd be a shame to stop now! In my case, Alot of the things I test on the Jeep are a little less conventional in scope, like the Oil Cooler, Headunit, or dual-core radiator. I like being able to report back to a group and receive consensus on those mods. I keep this build page (and a "copy" build page on OverlandBound's forum constantly updated because I receive good feedback from both pages. I like ORP, I've met you guys (you are my friends) and I'd like to do more trails in the future. It's just a long road from where we were to being ready to roll again. Almost there.
  9. It actually comes with Play store right on the bugger when you buy it! It does come with a .apk installer as well. One of the major issues that the earlier units had with play was that alot of them used a strange Hybrid Android/WinCE abomination. It made it so that most apps couldn't recognize the unit as Android (because it technically wasn't). In this case, All of Joying's current models run pure Android, and the functions which required WinCE to run have been rewritten into apps, which I can say are so far pretty well thought out and function pretty well. As for the sleep debacle, I found out it's actually a limitation of the motherboard itself, and the way the CPU behaves when Android move into it's "sleep" behavior. Joying has other new units they are working on which do support sleep... or "Quick Boot" at they are calling it. Full cold boot of the unit takes about 30-45 seconds, so it's not too bad waiting. Once my next modification to the Jeep is complete, that won't even be a huge issue.
  10. After many years of abuse, I finally decided to go ahead and replace the Clarion CZ-302 which has powered the Jeep's audio system for many years now. In recent times, it's bluetooth functionality had become fairly cumbersome and problematic to use. Since Andriod connectivity was the primary reason I was interested in this HU originally, and the rise of cheap-ish Andriod powered head units becoming readily available, I figured I'd cut out the middleman and give one of these units a try: My first impressions of this Joying branded unit are relatively positive. The unit is extremely snappy, and handles media extremely well. The only thing that irks me about this unit is that it doesn't support a sleep function- a gift and a curse. It won't run the battery down when the vehicle is off, but this means it has to cold boot if the vehicle is off for more than a minute. The fortunate part is that cold boot is rather fast. I let the Jeep warm up for a minute or two in the mornings anyways, and after my next mod is installed, that will seem like less of an issue anyways All in all, it's an addition that could be great, or could bite me in the butt down the road. It does have a 2 year warranty, so that is helpful for a while. It's the great experiment, I suppose. I can say that playback, radio, and the like sound fantastic, especially when compared to the early Android units which had interference issues. The real test is gonna be seeing how it holds up to the abuse offroad. It appears to be sturdy and well-constructed, so that seems rather hopeful. Another bonus is that Joying has been extremely receptive in answering my questions on the unit. I hope it lasts a pretty long time, honestly. We'll see in time.
  11. Not a whole lot new to report. The cooling system, despite having a much higher overall capacity to stock, continues to self-regulate extremely well in the cold. I was afraid I'd have issues with "Engine too cold" CELs given the High flow T-stat, dual-core rad, and Explorer 11 blade clutch fan I put in at the end of the summer. I still feel like the oil cooler is probably doing good things, but we'll wait for that oil to come out in a week or tow and see if it has broken down much. In the meantime, some good shenanigans coming up hopefully for tax season, so stay tuned! Also I did a quick 3 year update video on the Kanati Trail Hog A/Ts. So here's that:
  12. Thank you for the kind words. So far, I can say that the Oil Cooler has been a good addition.
  13. Well, I got to drive the Jeep to Sedona on (last) Sunday and run Broken Arrow Trail. Overall the performance was excellent and the Jeep drove admirably. Driving to Sedona (4 hours each way), running Broken Arrow, and plenty of time at idle, The Jeep consumed about 25 Gallons of gas total. I punch the numbers into my calculator, and that averages out to about 16 MPG. Much better than my previous two trips, where I averaged 8 MPG, and 6 MPG the time before that. There was a pretty stark difference in performance, too. This time around, it seemed like her power curve was correct again and she commanded herself pretty dang well up the hills and across the valleys. It's starting to look like we are truly on the mend!
  14. Well, to be fair, I have a few available! I've also spent a better part of the past two years gathering navigation data for the state and beyond...
  15. So, I had the opportunity to run Moss Wash in Kingman with a good friend on Monday, and boy oh boy, were the discoveries we made on the interesting side. I used the trip as an excuse to shake the dust off of my tablet and use it to navigate, and pull data off of the OBDII port. The overall results of the trip we're nothing short of excellent. This was the first moderate, non-exploratory trail she's been on in about two years. So, two years of mostly untested, fresh refits put to the test. The suspension cycled great, but will be phenomenal once I get extended brake lines and coil retainers bolted up. The new transfer case took the abuse no-sweat. And the one that made me nervous of course, engine performance. The 4.7 surged forward with very little issue, finally! Engine temps remained under control, and oil pressure remained higher than previous. The re-worked cooling system kept the Jeep between 190-208 degrees, which is pretty spectacular for crawling up the side of a mountain. On flat and downhill crawling, it would at times dip as low as 180, which is as (absolute) low as you want it to potentially go. I haven't really had a chance to look at other factors until now, either. The reworked intake & snorkel means that air at the manifold is anywhere from 10-20 degrees cooler than stock! Once I insulate the plumbing for the intake, it may drop further, too. I'm very pleased with the performance overall. It's very gratifying to have all that hard work come together like it has. And some questions were further dug into.... One thing we noticed is that my 1st gear crawl ratio seems steeper than the later model WJs. We were wondering if maybe this ties into the previous "Factory WJ/WG Hybrid" idea. In 1st, 4-lo, Pegasus will pretty much just crawl over just about anything on it's own. Curiosity continues to grow on this topic. First time leading a trail run of any sort, too. Exciting!
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