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ob1jeeper

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Everything posted by ob1jeeper

  1. Glad they worked for you John...
  2. Congrats "B"... Sweet looking ride...
  3. Pretty good information you shared Ryan... The gent with the glasses who was doing most of the talking/explaining, is the owner of Dyanatrac, and a knowledgeable axle/steering guy for sure... The only thing I take a small amount of exception to is the descritpion on how to measure/check toe-in. Marking both front AND back of the tire is not very accurate methodology, UNLESS you have a static marker, and can rotate the tire one full turn to mark a complete line circumferentially around the tire. It would be better to mark one spot on each tire, then rotate each tire to the fore-aft positions for measurement, to ensure you are always measuring the same lateral position.
  4. What it appears from your pics, is exactly what Ryan suggested you have. IE: a 2" spring spacer/puck "lift', essentially making the ride height 2" taller. It also appears that whoever did this puck/spacer lift, used the OEM shocks on the front, by adding the shock extenders that are clearly visible. I agree, it's difficult to tell from your pics, whether the rear shocks were changed to something more compatable with the puck lift, or whether they simpy retained the OEM rear shocks. In order to ensure that you DO NOT "bottom" the shocks (in this case the rears, but also true for ALL 4 corners), you will want to make sure that the shocks are not too long for the amount of possible compression of the suspension. Shocks which are too long, will bottom, and self-destruct. The simple path to measuing the minimum length needed for EITHER front or rear, is to remove the spring, then allow the axle to move to FULL compression against the bump-stop. Then with full compression, measure the distance between the shock mounting holes, and purchase a shock which has a compressed length slightly shorter that that dimension. Ryan's proposed "safet-clearance" measurement of approx 1/2-1 inch is a reasonable recommendation, to prevent damaging your new shocks. Hope this helps...
  5. Marty, A "body lift", is when the body is spaced /raised in respect to the frame. What you have described is a SUSPENSION SPACER lift, similar to a body lift, but with spacers inserted in-between the suspension and frame, rather than in-between the body-to-frame. Without photos of the "lift parts" you have, it is difficult to deduce what was used to affect your "lift", thus for all intents impossible to assist with helping you decide how to proceed with any new suspension "matching" components.. As for the steering stabilizer, my recommendation is to leave it until it no longer functions properly. FWIW: It's MAJOR responsibility is to control steering shimmy, that causes axle tramp. In layman's terms these days, it controls the dreaded "death wobble"... It will be more effective to ask for assistance from one of the experienced members (Kristopher, John Pa, etc.) who live close enough to look it over and help you determine what you actually have.
  6. Happy belated B-day Ryan...
  7. In some (or more than some, depending on your point of view), this type of "customer service" is simply lousy customer treatment. WHENEVER you are in business with the general public your customer, you should be aware that many, if not most, of them will not understand the fine details of metallurgy, and HELP them to understand what the various types are used for and assist them in choosing/selecting the correct one that best fits thier needs. To do otherwise is just plain lazy-assed arrogance... JMHO... YMMV...
  8. Well done "G"... This is THE reason to carry some sort of location equipment... One never knows when an emergency will arise...
  9. If my eyes are not decieving me, I think I have seen that somewhere before...
  10. Kris, I do not have any experience with this newer style filter media, as it was not "on the table" for testing/evaluatrion when I was involved in filtration testing. I will contact some of my friends/former co-workers to see what I can find out about them... May take me a while to find the correct person for that information, as I've been retired 16 years, and both people and materials have been under constant change since then...
  11. Good infor Jim... Thanks for the share...
  12. Scott, Here is a WIX number for a cellulose (paper) filter that is similar in size to the Gause units such as yours... WIX filter Part Number: WA9763 I suspect that if you go here https://www.wixfilters.com/Lookup/FilterBySize.aspx?catid=1&styleid=1 and search through the list of filters, you may find something that would work with minor, or no modifications to your current intake tubing... Hope this helps...
  13. Not to be a "Debbie Downer", but by far, the bulk of the dirt/gunk buildup that you found inside the intake is the result of poor filtration. From the tests I ran on a variety of filter types over the years, the OEM paper filter is FAR superior to that chunk of oil-soaked gauze... YMMV...
  14. So what was the repair you chose? May be good information for others to put in the old memory banks...
  15. Having done both this "tube-flying" (in Vegas), and the "jumping out of a perfectly good flying plane" thing , I'd be delighted to do either one again... They are "sort of similar", but decidely different...
  16. $100 for the clips ? ? ? ? ? WOW... It's been a couple of years, but IIRC, I paid something like $8-9 each for a couple of clips... Talk about inflation... Wowzers
  17. Might try checking with the dealer. Suspect they are not that expensive... (At least they weren't prohibitively $$ when I bought some for my truck a few years ago... )
  18. No worries Jim, Just thought you may know something that Xanterra isn't sharing with customers... We're giving serious consideration to cancelling our trip because of the restrictiveness they had thus far indicated will be imposed...
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